Mental health

Going Sane — exposing malpractice in the mental health industry 1


 

Lisa Sabey is the woman behind the documentary “Going Sane.” In this podcast we talk about:

-Malpractice in the field of mental health
-Lack of accounability and assessment
-Low standards of care for patients
-The importance of using evidence based therapy and evidence based practice
-The importance of rapport, but the great importance of effective treatment
-The ways in which the mental health field has to change in order to catch up with the medical field.

Watch Going Sane: http://goingsane.org/ (only $2.99 to buy and all proceeds go towards the making of documentaries like this!)

Over the last thirty years America has more than quadrupled its mental health spending and significantly increased the number of mental health professionals, yet many of the most common mental illnesses are on the rise. It seems strange that increased spending on mental health treatment is correlated with the growth of mental illness. But what if it’s not just a surprising correlation? What if the mental health industry is part of the problem? We interviewed three families dealing with mental illness and many of the world’s leading experts to discovered that most mental health patients are receiving outdated and disproven treatments. Witness the state of mental health care in America through our new 65 minute documentary Going Sane.

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About Tabitha Farrar

I work as Head of Marketing for a software startup in Boulder. As a recovered Anorexia sufferer, I advocate for proper understanding of eating disorders in my spare time. On that note, I wrote a book about my own journey into eating again called Love Fat.


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One thought on “Going Sane — exposing malpractice in the mental health industry

  • Juliana Winik

    So what happens if the individual does not respond to family (parents) even when they are educated and more than willing to help but the ED will not let them? (especially for adults) I don’t think it can work or does work the same as it does with adolescents. I also agree with the fact that residential or inpatient treatment can be more triggering than helpful for an individual. So what then? What is one to do?